Transgenerational effects of grandparental and parental diets combine with early-life learning to shape adaptive foraging phenotypes in Amblyseius swirskii

Peter Schausberger (Corresponding author), Dalila Rendon Castaneda

Publications: Contribution to journalArticlePeer Reviewed

Abstract

Transgenerational effects abound in animals. While a great deal of research has been dedicated to the effects of maternal stressors such as diet deficiency, social deprivation or predation risk on offspring phenotypes, we have a poor understanding of the adaptive value of transgenerational effects spanning across multiple generations under benign conditions and the relative weight of multigenerational effects. Here we show that grandparental and parental diet experiences combine with personal early-life learning to form adaptive foraging phenotypes in adult plant-inhabiting predatory mites Amblyseius swirskii. Our findings provide insights into transgenerational plasticity caused by persistent versus varying conditions in multiple ancestral generations and show that transgenerational effects may be adaptive in non-matching ancestor and offspring environments.
Original languageEnglish
Article number246
Number of pages10
JournalCommunications Biology
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Mar 2022

Austrian Fields of Science 2012

  • 106051 Behavioural biology

Keywords

  • ACARI
  • BEHAVIOR
  • CONSEQUENCES
  • GROWTH
  • INTRAGUILD PREDATION
  • MATERNAL PREDATOR-EXPOSURE
  • MEMORY
  • MITES
  • SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD
  • THRIPS

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